Articoli

Emergency Evacuation: Discussion

Emergency Evacuation: Discussion

 

The aim of this exploratory pilot study was to shine a light on the resource of leadership during an emergency situation. For this reason we proposed some hypothesis that regard connections between some variables that we believe can play an important role during emergencies. We took into account transformational leadership, knowledge about the emergency plan, positive attitude toward emergency plan, self-confidence and the team emergency response.

As predicted by hypothesis 1, higher levels of transformational leadership correspond to higher levels of self-confidence. The significant positive correlation we found supports our idea that transformational leaders will feel confident also during the emergency situation.

Also hypothesis 2 has been confirmed. Indeed, the statistical analysis shows that leaders who have a deeper knowledge about the emergency plan report higher levels of self-confidence. This means that being familiar with the procedures to following in case of emergency allow leaders to feel more confident when the dangerous situation really takes place.

In the same way, having a positive attitude toward the emergency plan is another key variable that positively affects the level of self-confidence. In fact, the correlation analysis has shown that the hypothesis 3 received statistical support: if a leader thinks that the emergency plan is understandable and safe, he/she will feel more sure about how to lead the situation.

The level of self-confidence, at the same time, affects the team emergency response. The correlation matrix, indeed, shows that there is a statistically significant positive correlation between the self-confidence and the team emergency response (hypothesis 4). This means that self-confident leaders have a positive effect on their team members during the emergency, leading them to perform the most appropriate actions.

Moreover, the correlation matrix shows two other relationships that haven’t been taken into account in the research questions chapter. The first one is that positive attitude toward the emergency plan and knowledge about it are strongly positively correlated. This finding is not surprising. Indeed, only if a leader knows the emergency plan he/she will develop a positive attitude toward it, or, on the contrary, only if a leader thinks that the emergency plan is important he/she will be motivated to read and memorize it. The second relationship that emerged from the correlation matrix is that knowledge about the emergency plan is directly and positively correlated to team emergency response. This means that leaders who have a good level of knowledge about how to behave in case of emergency have a positive effect on the emergency performance of their teams, probably suggesting them the right things to do in order to face the hazard.

The model we proposed, with transformational leadership, knowledge about the emergency plan and positive attitude toward it predicting the level of self confidence hasn’t received support from the statistics analysis (hypothesis 5). Indeed, differently to what we thought, knowledge is not a significant predictor. On the other hand, transformational leadership and positive attitude received statistical support. Surprisingly, this means that knowing what to do in case of emergency doesn’t have a predicting effect on the level of confidence in leading the same emergency. Coherently with what we supposed, instead, leaders who adopt a transformational style of leadership and, at the same time, have a positive attitude toward the emergency procedures will experience higher levels of self-confidence during the emergency.

Not even hypothesis 6 has received statistical support. Indeed, there is no statistical significance for the moderator effect of self-confidence in the relationship between transformational leadership and team emergency response.  This could be due to the small sample we used for this pilot study, or maybe truly there is not a significant effect between these variables. Nevertheless further researches are needed to give light to these topics, because there is a gap in the literature so far.

The descriptive analysis provided in this study depict a positive scenario of the emergency management in the organization considered.

Most of the immediate actions performed during the shock were pertinent with the ones suggested in the evacuation plan, like sheltering under the table. Also the team emergency response described by the leaders is positive: the most rated item regards the management of the situation as a team and the clarity of the leadership role. Less than the half of the participants reported that they needed to encourage someone which wasn’t calm and only a quarter of them had to convince someone to leave the building. These are both good indicators of the members performance. Team evacuation behavior can be also be considered positively: the items that received the higher rates regard the safely use of emergency exit in a reasonable time. Most of the leaders reported to have only a little bit of difficulties in leading the situation, and the mean of the self-confidence level was quite high (almost 70%). Results are really positive also taking into account leaders’ knowledge about the emergency plan (the mean of each itemis over 2.46 on a maximum of 3), and leaders’ attitude about it, which is quite positive (the mean of each item is over 3 on a maximum of 4). Moreover, asking about the effectiveness of a list of actions, the answers are pertinent with what the emergency plan recommends. Finally, drills are perceived quiet important or extremely important by eight out of ten leaders.

All this descriptive data enrich our comprehension of the situation happened in the organization we considered as well as this study that aimed to give a description and clarify the leader’s perspective during an emergency evacuation. Nevertheless, there are some limitations that affect this research.

The first one regards the number of participants which is too small. For this reason it could be useful to repeat the study with a bigger number of respondents and retest the 5th and 6th hypothesis that haven’t be statistically supported. It could be also interesting to collect participants from different firms and companies instead that from the same organization.

Another weakness of this paper is that leaders’ knowledge about emergency plan is assessed through questions to the leaders so the measure couldn’t be objective. It would be better to assess their level of knowledge through another questionnaire. For example, it could be more objective to verify if the respondents really know the content of the emergency plan (for example “according to the evacuation plan, where is the nearest emergency exit from your office?”), instead of asking the level of the agreement on the item “I know the emergency plan in case of evacuation”.

Also other type of variables present the same problem of objectivity. Team emergency and team evacuation response are assessed through questions to the leaders, so the measure could not be completely reliable. Also in this case it would be better to use another specific questionnaire able to assess objectively the level of team emergency and evacuation response. As an alternative these variables can be also assessed through some specific drills. Another idea could be to distribute these two scales to a sample of teams’ members as well and then confront their answers to leaders’ ones.

Finally, another factor that has to be taken into account is that social desirability bias is it likely to affect our data. This is because our sample is composed of managers and leaders that can be motivated to answer in a way to ingratiate the company or the employer, faking the results.

The present study is just an exploratory research, but it gives some interesting starting points that would be interested to be examined in depth. Further research is needed to clarify the questions raised in this report. For example, there are no studies analysis leadership in evacuation that take into consideration leadership styles. Also self-confidence is an aspect generally neglected in this field of study. Nevertheless, it is two factor are both involved during the evacuation process.

This study reaffirm, once again, the crucial importance of the psychological issues in evacuation management.  There are many questions that still have to be answered due to the complicated evacuation setting which involves individual, social and environmental factors. Nevertheless, continuing collecting data is of utmost importance to develop a comprehensive model of human behavior in evacuation. Psychological findings will be then added to engineering measures in the evacuation models that are really useful tools to predict time needed to exit buildings. Only with this synergy in efforts workers’ security in the workplaces would be pledged.

 

©  – MANAGEMENT OF AN EMERGENCY EVACUATION: A LEADER’S PERSPECTIVE – Sara Colangeli

Relationships between variables

Relationships between variables

 

Relationships between variables

We run a correlation to test the first fourth hypothesis.

Table 17

Correlation Matrix

Note. *p<.05, **p<.01

As shown in Table 17, transformational leadership and self-confidence are positively correlated, r(26)=.45, p<.05. So, hypothesis 1 can be confirmed. Also knowledge about the emergency plan and self-confidence are positively correlated, r(29)=.40, p<.05 (hypothesis 2). Hypothesis 3, as well, can be confirmed, because the table shows a strong positive correlation between positive attitude toward emergency plan and self-confidence, r(28)=.56, p=.01. As it was supposed in hypothesis 4, also self-confidence and team emergency response are positively correlated, r(28)=.44, p<.05. Moreover, the table shows another relationship that we haven’t supposed at the beginning of this study. Indeed, also knowledge about the emergency plan and team emergency response are positively correlated, r(33)=.39, p<.05. Finally, another interesting finding not considered in the hypothesis is that also positive attitude and knowledge are strongly positively correlated, r(34)=.60, p<.01.

Predictors of self-confidence

A multiple regression analysis was conducted to predict the level of self-confidence from theknowledge about the emergency plan, the positive attitude toward it and the transformational style of leadership. We considered self-confidence as a criterion and knowledge, positive attitude and transformational leadership as predictors. Results are reported in Table 18.

Table 18

Multiple Regression Analysis (dependent variable: self-confidence)

Note. R²=.65.

For this model, both the transformational leadership t(24)=2.21, p<.05 and the positive attitude t(24)=2.51, p<.05 are significant predictors of the team emergency response. On the other hand, knowledge t(24)= -.11, p=.91 resulted not significant. The relationship between the two predictors and the criterion is positive, meaning that is the level of transformational leadership or of the positive attitude rises, also the level of team emergency response will grow. Moreover, looking at the Bs, we can also notice that the positive attitude has a bigger impact (B=13.93) than the transformational leadership (B=10.60). The overall model, with the three predictors, is able to account for the 65% of the variance in the level of self-confidence.

So, the result provides partial confirmation for the hypothesis 5.

Self-confidence’s moderation effect

We tested the moderator effect of self-confidence between transformational leadership and team emergency response using a regression analysis. Results are reported in Table 19.

Table 19

Moderation Analysis (dependent variable: team emergency response)

Note. R² = .13

Looking at the last column, we can see that the interaction between the two variables is not statistical significant (p=. 91). So we are not able to confirm that the strength of the relationship between transformational leadership e team emergency response is affected by the level of self-confidence (hypothesis 5).

 

©  – MANAGEMENT OF AN EMERGENCY EVACUATION: A LEADER’S PERSPECTIVE – Sara Colangeli

Leadership, Creativity & Innovation: RESULTS

Leadership, Creativity & Innovation: RESULTS

Table 1 displays means, standard deviations, and inter correlations among all study variables.

Table  1.

** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).

CONSTRUCT VALIDITY.

According to Bartlett’s test, the matrix is not an identity matrix. The null hypothesis is rejected. The variables under analysis are correlated, thus factor analysis is justified. The Cumulative percentage is 61. 139. Four factors explain 61.139% of common variance.


Besides the reversed item of supervisor developmental feedback, all of the variables had values higher than 0.4. It had no loading on any factor that made weaker the correspondence between the structure of a set of indicators and the construct it measures.

RELIABILITY

Alpha Cronbachs for almost all of the measures were higher than .70. Removal of any item or set of items in any measure did not appreciably improve estimates of internal consistency. So, all the variables used in the research were internally consistent.  Separately measured they registered high alpha coefficients.

In the table below the alpha coefficients are presented for all of the variables.

A reversed item, supervisor developmental feedback, turned out to have slightly higher value than Alpha coefficient.  Nevertheless, a review of all of the scales together reveals that a high reliability was registered (.913).

GUIDE FOR TESTING THE METIATION EFFECTS IN MULTIPLE REGRESSION

To test the mediating effect, multiple regression analysis was run to analyze the relationship among all of the variables by first regressing the dependent variable on the independent variable, then regressing the mediator on the independent   variable, and finally regressing the dependent on both the independent variable and the mediator variable ( Baron & Kenny, 1986).

According to the authors (Baron & Kenny, 1986; Judd & Kenny, 1981) there are four steps  in establishing that a variable (intrinsic motivation) mediates the relation between a predictor variable and the outcome variable :  by first step is shown that there is a significant relation between the predictor and outcome. The second step is to show that the predictor is related to the mediator. Third step is to show that the mediator (intrinsic motivation) is related to the outcome variable (innovative behavior). The final step is to show that the strengths of the relation between the predictor and the outcome is significantly reduced when the mediator is added to the model.

Hypothesis 1: Supervisor developmental feedback is positively related to innovative behavior through the mediating role of intrinsic motivation.

Table 1

Table 1 provides the results of analysis to test the meditational hypothesis. The unstandardized regression coefficient (.40) related to the effect of supervisor developmental feedback was significant. (p<.0001). Thus, the supervisor developmental feedback and the requirement for the mediation in step 1 was met.

As mentioned above mediator variable (intrinsic motivation) on predictor variable (supervisor developmental feedback) was regressed in step 2.

The unstandardized regression coefficient (B=.23) related with this relation also was significant at the p<.0001 level. Thus the condition for step 2was supported, supervisor developmental feedback was again significant.

Further, to test whether mediator variable (intrinsic motivation) was related to outcome variable (innovative behavior) we regressed the latter simultaneously on both (mediator) intrinsic motivation and predictor (supervisor developmental feedback).  The coefficient concerning the relation between intrinsic motivation and supervisor developmental feedback also was significant. (B= .28, p<.0001).  Thus, the condition for step 3 was again supported. (supervisor developmental feedback was significant).

This third regression equation also provided an estimate of the relation between predictor and outcome variable. If B equals zero in that relation, there is complete mediation. However, that path was .48 and still significant (p<.0001).

It means that the relationship between the predictor (supervisor developmental feedback) and the outcome variable (innovative behavior) is partially mediated by intrinsic motivation (B is greater than zero). Consequently, the relationship between predictor and outcome variables is significantly smaller.

To summarize, the analysis showed that intrinsic motivation has a mediating role between the independent (supervisor developmental feedback) and dependent variable (innovative behavior).

It has weak correlation with supervisor developmental feedback (.28), thus could maintain its mediating role in that relation. At the same time, supervisor developmental feedback and intrinsic motivation both registered good correlation coefficients with innovative behavior: .43 and .52 respectively.

Hypothesis 2:  Creative self-efficacy will be positively related to innovative behavior through the mediating role of intrinsic motivation

Table 2

Table 2 provides the results of analysis:

The unstandardized regression coefficient (B=.41) associated with the effect of creative self-efficacy was significant (p<.0001). Thus, creative self efficacy was significant and the requirement for the mediation in step 1 was met.

In the regression of the mediator (intrinsic motivation) on predictor (creative self-efficacy) in step 2 the unstandardized regression coefficient (B = .68) was also significant at the p<.0001 level, thus, the condition for step 2was met, creative self-efficacy was significant.

By regressing innovative behavior simultaneously on both mediator (intrinsic motivation) and the predictor (creative self-efficacy) we tasted whether intrinsic motivation was related to innovative behavior.  The regression coefficient associated with relation between intrinsic motivation and innovative behavior was significant (B=.57, p<.000 ) Thus, the condition for the step 3 was significant. However in the third step creative self-efficacy was insignificant (B=.02; p = .827 >.05).

Due to high correlation with intrinsic motivation (.711), creative self-efficacy got excluded from the model, since regression allows the variables that are in weak correlation with each other and have strong predictive power on the outcome variable.

In this case regression made insignificant the variable that had less (.37) predictive power on innovative behavior than the other variable, intrinsic motivation (.52).   The strong power of self-efficacy is expressed by the high correlation with intrinsic motivation that, in its turn, shows high predictive value on outcome variable: innovative behavior.

© Leadership, Creativity & Innovation in Enterprises – Dott.ssa Nune Margaryan

Leadership, Creativity & Innovation: MEASURES

Leadership, Creativity & Innovation: MEASURES

Supervisor developmental feedback:  Consistent with prior research (see Zhou, 2002), we used a 3-item scale to measure the supervisor developmental feedback (e.g., when my supervisor gives me feedback, it helps me to learn and improve my job performance; Cronbach a – .64).

For measuring self-efficacy, along the lines of Tierney and Farmer (2002), we have proposed four types of questions (e.g., I consider that I’m good at developing and presenting new ideas)  regarding employees’ self-efficacy beliefs about their activities (Cronbach a = .85).  For measuring intrinsic motivation, a 5-item scale as posited by Tierney, Farmer, and Graen, (1999) was used (e.g., I like to find solutions for complex problems; Cronbach a – .86).

On innovative behavior, we have proposed seven self-reported questions (e.g., we try to find new technologies, products, services and new methods for conducting the work; see Tierney, Farmer, & Graen, 1999) about employees’ innovative behavior (Cronbach a – .92).   A Likert-type scale ranging from 1, strongly disagree, to 7, strongly agree, was used to define the answers.

RESULTS

Table 1 displays means, standard deviations, and inter correlations among all study variables.

Table  1.  Means, Standard Deviations, and Correlations among Variables

CONSTRUCT VALIDITY

According to Bartlett’s test, the matrix is not an identity matrix. The null hypothesis is rejected. The variables under analysis are correlated, thus factor analysis is justified. The Cumulative percentage is 61. 139. Four factors explain 61.139% of common variance.

Total Variance Explained

Besides the reversed item of supervisor developmental feedback, all of the variables had values higher than 0.4. It had no loading on any factor that made weaker the correspondence between the structure of a set of indicators and the construct it measures.

RELIABILITY

Alpha Cronbachs for almost all of the measures were higher than .70. Removal of any item or set of items in any measure did not appreciably improve estimates of internal consistency. So, all the variables used in the research were internally consistent.  Separately measured they registered high alpha coefficients.

In the table below the alpha coefficients are presented for all of the variables.

A reversed item, supervisor developmental feedback, turned out to have slightly higher value than Alpha coefficient.  Nevertheless, a review of all of the scales together reveals that a high reliability was registered (.913).

GUIDE FOR TESTING THE METIATION EFFECTS  IN MULTIPLE REGRESSION

To test the mediating effect, multiple regression analysis was run to analyze the relationship among all of the variables by first regressing the dependent variable on the independent variable, then regressing the mediator on the independent   variable, and finally regressing the dependent on both the independent variable and the mediator variable ( Baron & Kenny, 1986).

According to the authors (Baron & Kenny, 1986; Judd & Kenny, 1981) there are four steps  in establishing that a variable (intrinsic motivation) mediates the relation between a predictor variable and the outcome variable :  by first step is shown that there is a significant relation between the predictor and outcome. The second step is to show that the predictor is related to the mediator. Third step is to show that the mediator (intrinsic motivation) is related to the outcome variable (innovative behavior). The final step is to show that the strengths of the relation between the predictor and the outcome is significantly reduced when the mediator is added to the model.

Hypothesis 1: Supervisor developmental feedback is positively related to innovative behavior through the mediating role of intrinsic motivation.

Table 1 provides the results of analysis to test the meditational hypothesis. The unstandardized regression coefficient (.40) related to the effect of supervisor developmental feedback was significant. (p<.0001). Thus, the supervisor developmental feedback and the requirement for the mediation in step 1 was met.

As mentioned above mediator variable (intrinsic motivation) on predictor variable (supervisor developmental feedback) was regressed in step 2.

The unstandardized regression coefficient (B=.23) related with this relation also was significant at the p<.0001 level. Thus the condition for step 2was supported, supervisor developmental feedback was again significant.

Further, to test whether mediator variable (intrinsic motivation) was related to outcome variable (innovative behavior) we regressed the latter simultaneously on both (mediator) intrinsic motivation and predictor (supervisor developmental feedback).  The coefficient concerning the relation between intrinsic motivation and supervisor developmental feedback also was significant. (B= .28, p<.0001).  Thus, the condition for step 3 was again supported. (supervisor developmental feedback was significant).

This third regression equation also provided an estimate of the relation between predictor and outcome variable. If B equals zero in that relation, there is complete mediation. However, that path was .48 and still significant (p<.0001).

It means that the relationship between the predictor (supervisor developmental feedback) and the outcome variable (innovative behavior) is partially mediated by intrinsic motivation (B is greater than zero). Consequently, the relationship between predictor and outcome variables is significantly smaller.

To summarize, the analysis showed that intrinsic motivation has a mediating role between the independent (supervisor developmental feedback) and dependent variable (innovative behavior).

It has weak correlation with supervisor developmental feedback (.28), thus could maintain its mediating role in that relation. At the same time, supervisor developmental feedback and intrinsic motivation both registered good correlation coefficients with innovative behavior: .43 and .52 respectively.

Hypothesis 2:  Creative self-efficacy will be positively related to innovative behavior through the mediating role of intrinsic motivation

Table 2

Table 2 provides the results of analysis:

The unstandardized regression coefficient (B=.41) associated with the effect of creative self-efficacy was significant (p<.0001). Thus, creative self efficacy was significant and the requirement for the mediation in step 1 was met.

In the regression of the mediator (intrinsic motivation) on predictor (creative self-efficacy) in step 2 the unstandardized regression coefficient (B = .68) was also significant at the p<.0001 level, thus, the condition for step 2was met, creative self-efficacy was significant.

By regressing innovative behavior simultaneously on both mediator (intrinsic motivation) and the predictor (creative self-efficacy) we tasted whether intrinsic motivation was related to innovative behavior.  The regression coefficient associated with relation between intrinsic motivation and innovative behavior was significant (B=.57, p<.000 ) Thus, the condition for the step 3 was significant. However in the third step creative self-efficacy was insignificant (B=.02; p = .827 >.05).

Due to high correlation with intrinsic motivation (.711), creative self-efficacy got excluded from the model, since regression allows the variables that are in weak correlation with each other and have strong predictive power on the outcome variable.

In this case regression made insignificant the variable that had less (.37) predictive power on innovative behavior than the other variable, intrinsic motivation (.52).   The strong power of self-efficacy is expressed by the high correlation with intrinsic motivation that, in its turn, shows high predictive value on outcome variable: innovative behavior.

 

© Leadership, Creativity & Innovation in Enterprises – Dott.ssa Nune Margaryan

Conclusioni

Conclusioni

 

Ad ulteriore convalida delle tesi sopra esposte, si ritiene opportuno procedere ad un’analisi di maggior dettaglio, utilizzando i risultati parziali dei questionari per singola agenzia. In altre parole, ci si focalizzerà sui gap delle varie agenzie, ricavando da ciò delle conclusioni maggiormente ponderate. A tal fine si utilizzeranno delle “variabili empiriche di controllo”, che serviranno a dimostrare se effettivamente le considerazioni fatte sulla base del report medio di gruppo, trovano conferma nei risultati parzali delle singole agenzie. Si è così richiesto alle agenzie sottoposte ad indagine alcune informazioni di natura oggettiva, ossia quantificabili, da leggere alternativamente come gli effetti e le con-cause del non corretto o appropriato utilizzo delle leve motivazionali, qualora si evidenzi una loro corelazione con le leve stesse. Per maggiore chiarezza è opportuno procedere con ordine, analizzando i singoli aspetti. Perchè, poi, l’analisi parziale evidenzi dei pesi più determinanti, rispetto al particolare fenomeno osservabile in una singola agenzia, si è scelto di riaggregare le 12 agenzie in 4 gruppi caratterizzati dalla presenza, al loro interno, di agenzia con variabili di controllo analoghe. Per facilitare i confronti e riottenere report riferiti alle nuove unità di analisi (i gruppi omogenei e non la singola agenzia), si è ristrutturato in Matrix l’organigramma originario dell’azienda, introducendo le nuove modifiche.

Ritornando alla trattazione delle variabili di controllo, vengono adesso approfondite in dettaglio. Per quanto riguarda la selezione, si è scelto di richiedere il numero di ore di assenteismo mensile, ipotizzando che un eventuale elevato valore sia imputabile ad un’errata selezione di persone non motivate. Come da ipotesi di partenza, i gap attitudinali non sono correlabili a questa leva, essendosi riscontrati in tutti i gruppi bassi tassi di assenteismo. Riguardo alla disponibilità di percorsi di carriera, si è richiesta la permanenza media (in termini di mesi) dell’agente all’interno dell’affiliato, constatando come i gap attitudinali non siano nei gruppi di agenzie con permanenza media elevata. Evidentemente non sono importanti, nella fattispecie, gli incentivi a lungo termine, non venendo questo percepito come un lavoro che consente un elevato sviluppo di carriera. Non si può dire la stessa cosa riguardo una leva che sta sullo stesso orizzonte temporale: la formazione, essendo stata richiesta, in questo caso l’anzianità media (in termini di anni) dell’affiliato di provenienza. I gap attitudinali si sono concentrati maggiormente nei gruppi di agenzie più longeve, le quali, quindi, oltre a non aver investito in passato in formazione, sono probabilmente portatori di metodi gestionali più arretrati, non percependo l’importanza e la forza motivazionale dell’apprendimento continuo. Per quanto riguarda la comunicazione interna e il team working, i risultati parziali sobbalzano quelli sintetici. In questo caso infatti la variabile richiesta è stata il numero di riunioni e focus group mensili, laddove i maggiori gap si sono concentrati sui gruppi di agenzie che meno utilizzano questi strumenti di partecipazione e ascolto. Ciò conferma l’appropriatezza del loro utilizzo, che come si è detto era stata già prevista in ipotesi. Lo stesso dicasi per il clima interno, la cui appropriatezza è stata misurata da attività collaterali come newsletter, cene, tornei aziendali e quant’altro. Un elevato turnover annuale, è stato poi il parametro che ha spiegato il fallimento di politiche di incentivazione a breve termine, tra cui si fa rientrare la trasformazione di parte della retribuzione da variabile in fissa. Essendo i gap attitudinali correlati con le agenzie affette da più alto turnover, ciò non ha fatto altro che confermare le già previste caratteristiche “strutturali” del settore. Infine i gap attitudinali si sono maggiormente concentrati nelle agenzie in cui più carente è stata la predisposizione di indici di performance e la predisposizione di blueprint e manuali operativi, confermando come siano da ritenersi strategici, come previsto soprattutto nel contesto in esame, le politiche di goal setting e job desciption.

BIBLIOGRAFIA

  • Ajzen I. “Perceived Behavioral Control, Self-Efficacy, Locus of Control, and the Theory of Planned Behavior”. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 2002, 32,  pp. 1-20
  • Ajzen I. “The Theory of Planned Behavior”. Organizational Behavior And Human Decision Processes  50, 179-211 (1991)
  • Antonini F. “Adventure training – alla ricerca della motivazione perduta – Indiana Jones o Proust?”. Hamlet, rivista di Direzione del Personale, novembre 2003
  • Atti del convegno seminariale CGIL Lombardia. Evoluzioni e rivoluzioni nell’impresa fra organizzazione e cultura. Dalla storia verso i futuri possibili. Conferenze 2001
  • Barabino M C, Jacobs B, Maggio M A. “Diversity Management”, in Sviluppo & Organizzazione, n. 184 marzo, aprile 2001
  • Bartoli L. “Blended Learning: idee e soluzioni per lo sviluppo della conoscenza. La proposta formativa di Sfera.” Hamlet, rivista di Direzione del Personale, novembre 2003
  • Bombelli M C. “Management delle differenze: gestire il genere”. in  Economia & Management, n. 6, 1999
  • Chang J. “Motivation by Nation”. Sales and Marketing Management; Apr 2004; 156, 4; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 20
  • Conti R F and Warner M. A Customer-Driven Model of Job Design: Towards a General Theory. The Judge Institute of Management Studies WP 2/2001
  • Costa G (1989), “Le risorse umane”, in Rispoli M (A cura di) L’impresa industriale. Economia, tecnologia e management, II Edizione, Bologna, Il Mulino 1989
  • Cummings B. “Motivational Master”. Incentive; Sep 2004; 178, 9; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 46
  • DeNisi A S, Randolph W A and Blencoe A G. “Potential problems with peer ratings”. Academy of Management Journal (pre-1986); Sep 1983; 26, 000003; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 457
  • Elliot A J et al. “Competence Valuation as a Strategic Intrinsic Motivation Process.” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 26 No. 7, July 2000 780-794
  • Gagne M and Deci E L. “Self-determination theory and workmotivation”. Journal of Organizational Behavior 26, 331–362 (2005)
  • ISFOL. Competenze trasversali e comportamento organizzativo. Le abilità di base del lavoro che cambia. Franco Angeli, Milano 1993
  • Kahle D. “Staying Motivated In Challenging Times”. Agency Sales; Mar 2004; 34, 3; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 48
  • Kanfer R. Measuring Health Worker Motivation in Developing Countries. Major Applied Research 5,Working Paper 1. Bethesda, MD: Partnerships for Health Reform Project, Abt Associates Inc, January 1999
  • Kreisman B J. Insights Into Employee Motivation, Commitment and Retention. Ph.D. Research/White Paper Insights Denver February, 2002
  • Lambin J J. Marketing strategico e operativo. Mc-Graw-Hill, Milano, 2000.
  • Lamp L. Human Motivation in the Work Organization: Theories and Implications. New Aasia College Academic Annual VOL. XIX
  • Leonard N H, Beauvais L L and Scholl R W. A Self Concept-Based Model of Work Motivaton. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management in August, 1995
  • Likert R. Human organization: Its management and value. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1967.
  • McGregor D. L’aspetto umano dell’impresa. Milano: Franco Angeli, 1983
  • McGregor D. Leadership e motivazione nelle imprese. Milano: Franco Angeli, 1964
  • Meglino B M, DeNisi A S and Ravlin E C. “Effects of previous job exposure and subsequent job status on the functioning of  a realistic job preview”. Personnel Psychology; Winter 1993; 46, 4; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 803
  • Meglino B M, Denisi A S, Ravlin E C.“Effects of previous job exposure and subsequent job status on the functioning…”. Personnel Psychology; Winter 1993; 46, 4; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 803
  • Neirotti P e Paolucci E. Information technology, cambiamenti organizzativi e nuovi profili di competenze, paper presentato al workshop nazionale dei docenti e dei ricercatori di organizzazione aziendale, Genova, 7-8 febbraio 2002
  • Nelson B. “What Motivates Today’s Employees?” ABA Bank Marketing; Oct 2004; 36, 8; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 16
  • Pilati M, Tosi H e altri. Comportamento organizzativo. Egea Publishing, 2002
  • Ramlall S. “A Review of Employee Motivation Theories and their Implications for Employee”. Journal of American Academy of Business, Cambridge; Sep 2004; 5, 1/2; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 52
  • Reilly P. “Individual Performance-Related Pay: does it drive better organisational performance”. Training Journal; Feb 2005; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 36
  • Ricerca AIDP Triveneto. Lavorare con le Risorse Umane. Persone, strutture e carriere nelle Direzioni  del Personale del Triveneto. Associazione Italiana per la Direzione del Personale, novembre 2003
  • Robertson I T, Smith M. Motivation and Job Design. Theory, Research and Practis. Institute of Personnel Management, Lond (1985) [ trad. it., La motivazione e la progettazione delle mansioni. Teoria, ricerca e pratica, Milano, Franco Angeli Libri  Srl (1987) ]
  • Rossi A. “Il bilancio di competenze”. In Sviluppo & Organizzazione, n.182, 2000
  • Schweiger D M.; Denisi A S. “Communication with Employees Following a Merger: A Longitudinal Field Experiment”, Academy of Management Journal. Mar 1991; 34, 1; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 110
  • Stajkovic A D, LuthansF. “Behavioral Management and Task Performance in Organizations: Conceptual Background, Meta-Analysis, and Test of Alternative Models”. Personnel Psychology 56, 2003
  • Tosi H L, Katz J P and Gomez-Mejia L R. “Disaggregating the agency contract: The effects of monitoring, incentive alignment, and term in office on agent decision making”. Academy of Management Journal; Jun 1997; 40, 3; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 584
  • Tosi H L, Werner S. “Managerial discretion and the design of compensation strategy”. Academy of Management Journal; 1995; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 146
  • Tosi H L, Werner S. Other People’s Money: Effects of Ownership on Compensation Strategy and Executive Pay. Working Paper 94 – 12, CAHRS / Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
  • Tosi H L. “Improving Management By Objectives: A Diagnostic Change Program”. California Management Review (pre-1986); Fall 1973; 16, 000001; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 57
  • Tosi H L. “Setting Goals in Management by Objectives”. California Management Review (pre-1986); Summer 1970; 12, 000004; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 70
  • Trevisani D. Negoziazione Interculturale: Comunicazione oltre le barriere culturali. Franco Angeli editore, Milano, 2005

© Analisi dei processi di motivazione nella gestione delle risorse umane – Davide Barbagallo

I risultati della sperimentazione on the job

I risultati della sperimentazione on the job

 

Come si vede dal profilo di gruppo (vedasi sotto) elaborato da Matrix, ossia dalla media fra tutti profili degli agenti appartenenti ai 12 affiliati, si ha un buon accostamento complessivo al profilo dell’agente ideale, valorizzabile intorno all’87%, validando l’ipotesi secondo cui viene fatta un’attenta politica di selezione.  Ciò che coglie immediatamente l’attenzione è invece il minor accostamento rilevato nelle modalità di comunicazione e di integrazione, rispettivamente del 71 e del 74%, a dispetto delle ipotesi iniziali che ritenevano fortemente sviluppate le politiche di comunicazione e di miglioramento del clima interno, mediante la predisposizione della potente piattaforma informativa e delle riunioni di area in cui si fanno partecipare anche gli agenti e le coordinatrici.

È evidente, pertanto, che il coinvolgimento e la partecipazione vanno ricercati in altre sfere.

Gli elementi importanti affinché le risorse si integrino e rimangono fedeli vanno ricercati negli alti valori riscontrati nella modalità di relazione, organizzativa (misurata dalla possibilità di pianificare il proprio lavoro) e realizzativa.

Ciò indica, come previsto, che gli strumenti di cui dispongono gli agenti e il generale clima positivo e di fiducia che si respira in azienda, rendono il lavoro autonomo e sviluppano la capacità di lavorare attivamente, con impegno e determinazione.

Il valore oltre la norma (120%) della modalità assertiva, che indica la predisposizione al pensiero positivo e propositivo, avvalora l’ipotesi di base precedentemente ricordata.

Testimonia altresì, la presenza di forti motivazioni intrinseche, alle quali la tensione verso l’autonomia e l’empowerment hanno sicuramente dato ascolto.

Questa circostanza rappresenta tuttavia un rovescio oltre che un risvolto della medaglia.

I valori intermedi relativi alla modalità decisionale (nell’assumersi la responsabilità delle conseguenze delle proprie scelte), di gestione del consenso, di leadership e di gestione dello stress, delineano un gruppo senza un chiaro ruolo di guida, in cui la politica del demandare ha sviluppato più che una facoltà di azione cosciente, una gestione tendenzialmente emotiva della complessità.

Ma ciò appare coerente con l’ipotesi di fondo, secondo cui sono da ritenersi carenti le azioni prima definite di “motivazione programmabile” o centrate sulla motivazione estrinseca, quali i percorsi di carriera, gli obiettivi, e la progettazione della mansione.

Anche la modalità di apprendimento, come pure la modalità di adattabilità al cambiamento, infatti, risultano avere un accostamento medio, essendo il risultato di intuizioni personali e di una formazione carente.

Non si riscontrano, infine,particolari valori segnaletici nell’accostamento dell’85% della modalità di motivazione e automotivazione, al fine di indagare la presenza e l’eventuale appropriatezza di  incentivi a breve termine. Ciò sarà possibile attraverso alcuni accorgimenti di cui si darà conto nel prossimo paragrafo.

 

 

© Analisi dei processi di motivazione nella gestione delle risorse umane – Davide Barbagallo

La correlazione tra leve motivazionali e performance

La correlazione tra leve motivazionali e performance

 

 

L’utilizzo dello strumento informatico Matrix si inserisce in questa fase in cui si intende misurare il livello di motivazione delle risorse attualmente impiegate in azienda.

Come si è visto nella sezione a ciò dedicata, questa attività deve basarsi sulla individuazione di un profilo ideale a monte, a cui raffrontare le rilevanze empiriche derivanti dall’analisi delle performance, per una maggiore validazione dei criteri caratterizzanti il profilo ideale stesso.

In questa attività ci si è raccordati con il responsabile di area, insieme al quale sono state preliminarmente individuate le competenze distintive di base che devono caratterizzare il ruolo in esame, affinché esso possa realizzare le performance attese e gli obiettivi di business.

Tali competenze astratte sono state poi tradotte in comportamenti osservabili e di comportamenti attesi.

Si sono inoltre tradotti i comportamenti osservabili in attitudini più generiche, caratterizzanti una prestazione eccellente, in modo da sottoporre agli agenti il test attitudinale presente in Matrix, confrontando i risultati su grandezze omogenee.

In conclusione, una volta definiti i livelli di competenza, i comportamenti osservabili, le attitudini associate ed i rispettivi pesi, si arriva alla definizione del “profilo ideale”.

Questa operazione viene effettuata su Matrix, attraverso la funzione Configura . Volendo poi associare, come detto le attitudini generiche a prestazioni specifiche, si è ritenuto di operare una ancora maggiore contestualizzazione del campo di indagine, ridefinendo un nuovo profilo ideale mediato, ricavato dal profilo di un “agente modello”, ossia di un agente che le performance storiche dimostrano aver avuto il maggiore incremento di sviluppo delle competenze strategiche del ruolo, come da rilevazioni trimestrali riportate in figura.

Ciò si realizza in Matrix dal  menù Analisi & Valutazioni. Si mostra di seguito l’output che ne viene fuori da queste operazioni.

Si è proceduto, a questo punto, a sottoporre il test attitudinale presente in Matrix agli agenti delle 12 agenzie del comprensorio catanese. I risultati serviranno ad individuare le variabili motivazionali coinvolte, attraverso il confronto che Matrix automaticamente fa tra il profilo analizzato e il profilo ideale, precedentemente impostato. Inoltre attraverso i report prodotti da Matrix si potrà ricavare l’adeguatezza nell’uso delle leve motivazionali prima indicate.

 

© Analisi dei processi di motivazione nella gestione delle risorse umane – Davide Barbagallo

 

 

Il caso oggetto di studio

Il caso oggetto di studio

 

 

In questa sede si intende applicare il primo software trattato, per fornire un’esemplificazione pratica di un possibile utilizzo degli strumenti informatici a supporto della gestione delle Risorse Umane. Nel caso specifico l’obiettivo è quello di validare, attraverso un’indagine empirica, le politiche di motivazione utilizzate dalla rete di agenzie immobiliari in franchising Frimm-Group. Innanzitutto vanno spiegate le ragioni che hanno spinto alla scelta di questa azienda. Da un lato, utilizzare come caso pratico un azienda in franchising ha consentito di indagare le politiche di incentivazione in più unità produttive, facilitando la possibilità di confronti, volendo imprimere all’indagine un’ottica di benchmaking interno, concetto precedentemente esposto. In questo caso, poi, il confronto acquista una validità maggiore, se si riflette sul fatto che ad essere indagate sono politiche gestionali che, seppur derivanti da diverse e autonome unità decisorie (i singoli franchisee), si inseriscono all’interno di una comune linea di gestione, derivante dall’applicazione di procedure e metodi amministrativi uniformemente impartiti dal franchising. Pur avendo le possibilità di svolgere l’indagine su altri franchising dello stesso settore come Tecnocasa, o di altri settori come la già citata Compagnia della Bellezza, che cortesemente hanno mostrato ampia disponibilità, si è ritenuto che questa scelta avrebbe prodotto risultati eccessivamente disomogenei, in quanto derivanti da contesti aziendali molto diversi. Inoltre, per una maggiore standardizzazione delle condizioni di ricerca, si è scelto di limitare l’indagine al territorio catanese, coordinandosi pertanto con il capo area per la provincia di Catania della Frimm-Group, Angelo Maugeri, al quale è dovuto un particolare ringraziamento.  La scelta di una precisa localizzazione, oltre ad essere dettata da esigenze logistiche nel reperimento di dati e contatti, si ritiene avere il pregio di fornire uno scenario di indagine maggiormente omogeneo, in quanto oltre al contesto aziendale, viene tenuto fermo anche il background socio-culturale che, come si è ampiamente dibattuto, può avere un’influenza determinante nelle politiche di gestione delle Risorse Umane.

Infine, un altro motivo che ha spinto alla trattazione del caso Frimm-Group deriva proprio dalle peculiarità del suo business. L’azienda, fondata nel 2000, ha lanciato un nuovo modo di fornire il servizio immobiliare, segnando una rottura epocale con il sistema di gestione che in questo settore aveva caratterizzato gli altri competitori fino ad allora. Rifacendosi al sistema anglosassone, ha infatti scardinato il principio di esclusività delle zone di competenza, che era stato il modo con cui ogni franchising immobiliare aveva modellato lo sviluppo delle agenzie sul territorio, con la finalità strategica di garantire ad ogni nuovo affiliato un mercato potenziale, derivante da una partizione ed equa distribuzione dell’intero mercato nazionale. In altre parole ha consentito, diversamente dagli altri franchising, che ogni affiliato potesse negoziare la compravendita o il nolo di immobili appartenenti anche ad aree di competenza geografica di un altro affiliato del franchising stesso. Questa circostanza, che a prima vista può sembrare una guerra fraterna, ha invece consentito una sana competizione interna, ma soprattutto ha aperto le porte del mercato nazionale a qualsiasi affiliato, che per essere competitivo ha rinunciato a qualche percentuale di guadagno, ma si è ritrovato a poter contare su un business numericamente molto più elevato. Se si pensa poi che le nuove tecnologie e la facilità degli spostamenti, ha ridotto enormemente l’esigenza del servizio di prossimità, anche nel settore immobiliare, si capisce come l’unicità della strategia di gestione di ogni affiliato insieme all’aumento della mobilità del consumatore, abbiano reso più coerente tutto ciò. Se a questo si aggiunge che l’azienda in pochi anni è cresciuta a livello esponenziale, moltiplicando di mese in mese il numero di affiliati, sottraendone alla concorrenza, tanto da essere la terza azienda del settore, si capisce come la business idea è stata e continua ad essere vincente. Tra l’altro, anche se la possibilità di invadere le reciproche aree di influenza territoriale fra gli affiliati era (in verità eccezionalmente) consentita in altri franchising, si è potuto constatare come, non essendo questa la circostanza abituale, l’effetto è stato più che altro l’avvicendarsi di fenomeni di cannibalismo e conflittualità tra le varie agenzie.

Per rendere effettiva questa scelta strategica Frimm-Group fornisce ad ogni affiliato una piattaforma informatica, ossia un contenitore web di servizi, utilità e informazioni, pensato per coordinare l’attività delle agenzie e favorire la comunicazione tra Franchisor, affiliato e aziende partner (dal momento che Frimm-Group prevede la libera adesione al suo sistema anche a franchising esterni). Il sistema FRIMM prevede che i franchisees possano interagire fra loro e scambiarsi notizie in tempo reale, ma soprattutto consente di disporre di un database contenente un portafoglio di immobili ovunque disponibili  e aggiornato in tempo reale. I sistemi di comunicazione impiegati attraverso la piattaforma, consentono così alle informazioni di fluire con estrema rapidità attraverso tutta la rete, permettendo un’ottimizzazione del lavoro delle singole agenzie e favorendo la loro collaborazione. Vengono ad esempio forniti servizi on-line per accedere alle varie convenzioni, scaricare modulistica sempre aggiornata, ottenere tutte le informazioni aziendali, contattare i servizi di assistenza, chiedere pareri ad esperti professionisti. Ma vengono offerti anche servizi collaterali alla vendita degli immobili, finalizzati ad ottenere una maggiore fidelizzazione della propria clientela e ad ampliare ancor di più le possibilità di guadagno, con l’ottica di valorizzare una figura professionale globale, pronta a rispondere ad ogni esigenza del mercato immobiliare moderno. L’affiliato FRIMM, inoltre, ha a sua disposizione un vero e proprio ufficio acquisti che gli permette di usufruire di beni e servizi a condizioni estremamente convenienti, consentendogli di abbattere in maniera considerevole i costi di gestione e compensare ampiamente il costo dell’affiliazione. Si va, infatti, dalla consulenza finanziaria al sostegno assicurativo, dall’assistenza tecnico-legale fino al semplice trasloco, grazie a vantaggiosi accordi con partner di assoluto rilievo.

La cosa che in questa sede risulta di particolare interesse, è la circostanza per cui nel ventaglio di strumenti di cui si è parlato, si è scelto di offrire in convenzione agli affiliati, la possibilità di usufruire, fra gli strumenti della piattaforma informatica, del software Matrix che, come precedentemente esposto funziona in modalità ASP. Tale circostanza ha intanto giustificato l’interesse alla trattazione di questa specifica azienda come caso pratico, potendosi rilevare come la scelta operata dal franchisor di rendere disponibile in convenzione un software come Matrix, risulta essere un chiaro segno di come si reputi importante e strategica la corretta gestione delle Risorse Umane, al punto di indurre l’affiliato medio a servirsi di strumenti che compensino le (normalmente) scarse competenze in materia. In questo modo, inoltre, si è avuta la concreta possibilità di esemplificare l’utilizzo di uno strumento informatico, applicato ad un’analisi pratica, a completamento di un capitolo dedicato alle potenzialità dell’ICT nella gestione delle Risorse Umane. Un particolare ringraziamento è dovuto pertanto allo sviluppatore del software, responsabile della società che lo ha prodotto, il Dott. Andrea Castello, nell’averne permesso l’utilizzo “fuori convenzione”.

© Analisi dei processi di motivazione nella gestione delle risorse umane – Davide Barbagallo

Vita in ambienti confinati: aspetti psicologici e criteri di selezione del team

Vita in ambienti confinati: aspetti psicologici e criteri di selezione del team

 

Abstract

La vita in condizioni come quelle antartiche presenta una serie di difficoltà non comuni alla vita di tutti i giorni. Questo tipo di ambientazione ha spesso suscitato curiosità popolare e scientifica riguardo le difficoltà psicologiche attraversate dagli spedizionieri. L’intento di questo breve saggio è quello di mettere in evidenza le caratteristiche principali per la buona riuscita di una missione in questi territori, seguendo i più importanti esempi della letteratura scritta fino a questo momento.

 

1 – Introduzione

Le stazioni dell’Antartide in inverno sono luoghi isolati e solitari, spesso spazzate da forti venti, soggette a lunghi cicli solari, e fenomeni geomagnetici. Nonostante per molti versi l’Antartide sia simile all’Artide, nessun gruppo umano indigeno vi ha mai vissuto, contrariamente a quanto succede nel circolo polare Artico. Per questi motivi, per certi versi, le condizioni di vita all’interno di una stazione polare Antartica sono molto simili a quelli riscontrabili all’interno di capsule spaziali o sottomarini (Suefeld, Steel, 2000). Generalmente si ritiene, che nonostante la scelta di fare parte di questi luoghi per un periodo più o meno lungo sia volontaria, le caratteristiche da cui sono contraddistinti generi inevitabilmente situazioni di stress più o meno marcate. Le nuove condizioni a cui ci si deve abituare richiedono forti dosi di coping e capacità di adattamento personale.

Una delle difficoltà maggiori, sicuramente, è il fatto che questi ambienti espongano gli individui a condizioni di vita radicalmente differenti dalle normali abitudini quotidiane (Fischer, 1994) nonché il fatto che essi richiedano strategie di coping inusuali.

La salienza di queste caratteristiche ha generato numerosi studi sia riguardo gli agenti stressori ambientali, sia riguardo levariabili che influenzano le differenze di comportamento individuali, nella percezione dello stress, come nella gestione e nella resistenza allo stesso. Queste ultime includeranno, inoltre, fattori di gruppo, ambientali e di personalità.

Nel corso degli anni il design ambientale (Stuster, 1996), la selezione del personale (Taylor, 1987) e la composizione del gruppo e della leadership (Natani e Shurle, 1974) sono state le basi della ricerca psicosociale, dei test e delle disposizioni circa gli abitanti delle zone antartiche, nonché di ambienti simili, che definiremo “capsulari”.

Certamente, oggigiorno, le condizioni in cui versano le stazioni polari sono ben lontane da quelle che caratterizzarono l’epoca d’oro delle esplorazioni in Antartide, escludendo quindi l’insufficienza di cibo, riparo e cure mediche, così come il totale isolamento dal mondo esterno. Ciononostante, è certo che non tutti gli individui possiedono le risorse interne per affrontare un intero inverno in condizioni come quelle antartiche (Weiss et al., 2000).

Vari studi (i.e. Palinkas, 1986), nondimeno, hanno evidenziato come la maggioranza dei soggetti inviati in Antartide abbia completato con successo il proprio compito senza gravi problemi, specialmente a lungo termine, mostrando, al contrario, benefici a lungo termine per quanto riguarda lo stato di salute e il successo professionale.

 

2 – Il soggiorno in ambienti polari

Nell’analisi compiuta sui diari di alcuni esploratori britannici, scritti agli inizi del ventesimo secolo, Mocellin et al. (1991), hanno mostrato come le condizioni polari non siano necessariamente foriere di aumenti dello stato d’ansia. Nonostante le condizioni fossero obiettivamente più pericolose, le tecnologie meno avanzate, molti esploratori menzionano esperienze positive, persino nei periodi di soggiorno più difficili. Questi includevano commenti sulla grandiosa bellezza del paesaggio, episodi di serenità e rilassamento e sentimenti di crescita personale. Il livello di stress si era mantenuto sorprendentemente basso, anche durante il periodo di stallo che viene definito più che altro “noioso”.

Gli autori non hanno trovato nessuna differenza significativa, inoltre, nel livello di ansia di soggetti in Artide o in Antartide, nonostante, nel secondo ambiente, le condizioni meteorologiche siano notevolmente più difficili. Molti spedizionieri segnalavano, all’arrivo, sentimenti di eccitazione e durante il periodo di stallo i commenti diventavano maggiormente positivi, fatto probabilmente dovuto all’instaurazione di una routine all’interno del gruppo e della progressione positiva della missione.

Riguardo le condizioni generali dell’ambiente Suefeld (1998) afferma che i soggiorni polari, da questo punto di vista, potrebbero apparire simili ad altri ambienti difficili, molti dei quali possono apparire terribili visti dall’esterno ma con cui le persone trovano frequentemente buone strategie di fronteggiamento con risultati positivi nella maggior parte dei casi.

 

3 – Le interazioni all’interno del gruppo

Gli individui che si trovano in condizioni isolate e confinate devono necessariamente interagire frequentemente e strettamente con il gruppo di cui fanno parte. Secondo il modello di Olivetti Belardinelli (1987) gli assestamenti in questo tipo di interazioni sono raggiunti attraverso l’adattamento delle relazioni da interne ad esterne. L’Antartide è luogo più freddo, più sopraelevato. più secco, ventoso e meno accessibile di tutti i continenti terrestri (Cornelius, 1991): la sopravvivenza umana è possibile solo con l’aiuto di complessi supporti tecnologici, nonché di un ben strutturato piano di lavoro. La capacità di adattamento umano a questo ambiente, nonostante tutte le difficoltà che sembra presentare ad una prima analisi, si dimostra particolarmente efficace: molti autori (i.e. Latis, 1968, Law, 1960; Levesque, 1991; Palinkas, 1986) pongono l’accento sulla grande rilevanza di fattori psicologici, sociali e culturali nei processi di adattamento personali durante la permanenza.

Una ipotesi abbastanza comune è che gli ambienti esotici aumentino i conflitti interpersonali, la rabbia e l’irritabilità, che a loro volta influenzeranno la coesione all’interno del gruppo, ipotesi che sono state riscontrate da diversi autori (i.e. Gunderson e Nelson, 1963; Gunderson, 1966; Law, 1960; Palinkas, 1986). Le ostilità, comunque, sono viste in modo negativo (Lugg, 1977) in quanto pericolose per la coesione all’interno di questi gruppi e gli individui sviluppano una serie di pattern comportamentali che aiutano il contenimento dei conflitti (Harrison e Connors, 1984) come ad esempio evitare giochi altamente competitivi o la comunicazione emozionale. La cosa più importante è la conservazione dell’armonia all’interno del gruppo (Law, 1960). Una possibile spiegazione a questo fenomeno è che i conflitti tra membri potrebbero avere effetti devastanti per la sicurezza dell’intero gruppo in caso di eventi critici. Di conseguenza, la pressione sociale per l’adeguamento alle norme del gruppo e per il raggiungimento di obiettivi comuni diventa molto alta, così come l’importanza del groupthink può diventare particolarmente elevata in caso di situazioni di isolamento (Helmreich, 1983).

 

4 – Gli ambienti “capsula”

Suedfeld (2000) descrive gli ambienti “capsula” come isolati e confinati (ICE, isolated, confined environment), questa categoria si incrocia, poi, con la categoria degli ambienti estremi e inusuali (EUE, extreme, unusual environments), in genere esotico, anormale o particolarmente stressante. Si noti che la definizione dipende dall’occhio dell’osservatore: così come la tundra artica parrebbe strana e pericolosa ad un abitante di New York, Times Square potrebbe dare la stessa impressione ad un cacciatore Inuk

che vi si trovi improvvisamente.

Di fatto, però, si può indicare con il termine estremo qualsiasi ambiente i cui parametri siano sostanzialmente al di fuori da quelli ottimali per la sopravvivenza umana, nonostante comunque vi possano vivere gruppi, e inusuale per denotare condizioni che siano fortemente devianti rispetto a quelle dei più, anche se non per la totalità delle comunità umane. Alcuni ambienti si possono classificare EUE anche solo temporaneamente, ad esempio nel caso di una guerra o di una calamità naturale. Molti EUE comprendono non solo la lontananza fisica dal resto della popolazione, ma anche la difficoltà di accesso alle risorse esterne, oltre ad un range spaziale ben definito.

Vi possono essere ICE in luoghi non EUE, come ad esempio nel caso di prigioni, campi di prigionia, comunità che lavorano per certi periodi nelle miniere o sulle piattaforme petrolifere, abitanti di eremi, gli equipaggi nelle navette spaziali e in simulatori simili, il personale delle aree di controllo missilistiche e vari altri. ICE locati in zone EUE possono includere deserti caldi o freddi, isole disabitate, picchi montuosi, capsule.

Le capsule hanno la particolarità di essere lontane da altre comunità, locate in condizioni estreme per la sopravvivenza umana, e difficili da raggiungere o lasciare. Sono inoltre abitate da gruppi , composti artificialmente, di persone che vengono allontanate dalla loro normale vita quotidiana e che si trovano in quella situazione per completare un compito o un obiettivo ben preciso. le escursioni all’esterno sono rare e disagevoli, oltre che frequentemente pericolose. Importanti all’interno della capsula sono gli spazi

lavorativi, le zone living così come zone ricreative, infermeria, zone per la preparazione e la consumazione dei cibi e comunicazione con l’esterno.

All’interno di questi ambienti, le indagini di tipo psicologico sono piuttosto dispendiose. Piuttosto che direttamente in loco, spesso si preferisce l’uso di simulazioni, meno costose, più sicure e facilmente accessibili. I metodi utilizzati sono i più vari: test psicometrici, interviste, esperimenti in laboratorio, osservazione partecipativa, studi sul campo simulazioni e metodi qualitativi, con analisi di contenuto. I dati raccolti nelle capsule, per ovvie ragioni situazionali, forniscono dati di piccoli campioni, sicuramente non raccolti a caso, e quindi non necessariamente rappresentativi dell’intera popolazione. I dati raccolti finora, però, presentano una grande concordanza interna, essendo stati replicati in diversi ambienti, in diversi gruppi e in più di un ambiente capsula, cosa che accresce notevolmente la credibilità delle conclusioni che sono state fatte sinora (Suefeld e Steel, 2000).

L’immagine che spesso viene enfatizzata della vita nella capsula è quella della deprivazione, della fatica, di forti stress e pericoli. Molto spesso l’accento è posto sulle difficoltà nell’interazione fra membri del gruppo, negli scontri interpersonali, nelle discordi riguardo le procedure da seguire sia con l’organizzazione centrale che con i capi, con menzioni di frequenti ammutinamenti e ribellioni. Quello che non viene menzionato, spesso, è la frequenza di comportamenti simili in caso di ambienti noiosi, monotoni, ma familiari (Douglas, 1991).

Secondo Suefeld (2000) è importante concentrarsi, invece, sugli aspetti positivi e salutari dell’esperienza della vita in capsula, oltre ovviamente ad analizzare gli aspetti negativi.

Per molti dei soggetti che passano un certo periodo in un ambiente capsulare, almeno per quelli per cui il soggiorno non si è trasformato in un disastro completo, l’esperienza è diventata una parte importante della vita, percepita come un stimolo alla crescita, al rafforzamento personale all’approfondimento della propria psiche, da ricordarsi con orgoglio e piacere.

 

5 – Aspetti psicologicamente rilevanti dell’ambiente-capsula

In passato la psicologia ha occupato un posto di minore importanza nelle scienza polari, rispetto alle altre discipline (Suefeld, 1991). Il Comitato Scientifico sulle Ricerche Antartiche (sigla inglese SCAR), un’associazione non governativa che coordina e monitora tutte le ricerche antartiche grazie agli accordi internazionali, ha approvato solo nel 1987 l’aggiunta di un rappresentante dell’Unione Internazionale delle Scienze Psicologiche all’interno dell’organico. Attualmente, il ruolo della ricerca psicologica in

questo campo è riconosciuta e presa in considerazione nella creazione degli obiettivi e nelle attività attuali dei gruppi che affrontano un periodo nelle zone polari.

Suefeld e Steel (2000) pongono una lista di diversi aspetti che possono essere potenzialmente stressori in un ambiente particolare come quello della capsula. Come vedremo, questa lista presenta una serie di caratteristiche spesso intrinseche alla vita nella capsula, che possono essere moderate e rese meno cruciali, se non, dove possibile, evitate completamente.

Si ritiene particolarmente importante la riduzione dello stress dove possibile perché questo non potrà che migliorare il clima all’interno del gruppo e favorire la cooperazione per portare avanti obiettivi comuni, oltre a mantenere alto il livello di motivazione personale.

La letteratura popolare e professionale riguardo gli ambienti polari ha a lungo parlato della “sindrome dell’inverno”. Molti membri degli equipaggi inviati durante l’inverno polare hanno dimostrato combinazioni di depressione, irritabilità, danni cognitivi, disturbi del sonno e stati di coscienza alterati (Palinkas e Browner, 1995). Altri sintomi riportati durante questo periodo sono apatia, problemi psicosomatici e mancanza di igiene personale tra alcuni membri del gruppo (e.g. Taylor, 1987).

Suefeld e Steel (2000) individuano diverse fonti negli ambienti-capsula che accrescono lo stress. Queste fonti vengono divise in quattro categorie principali di seguito riportate: stressori fisici; fattori psicoambientali, che sono determinati dalle reazioni degli individui alle condizioni ambientali; fattori sociali, legati alle relazioni interpersonali; fattori temporali, relativi al passare del tempo.

 

5.1 – Stressori fisici

La natura pericolosa dei luoghi in cui vengono installate le capsule fa sì che si ponga un particolare accento sull’identificazione dei pericoli che possono incorrere. Nella regione Antartica gli imprevisti deterioramenti delle condizioni climatiche, la mancanza di un adeguato equipaggiamento (ad esempio una radio) o abbigliamento durante le escursioni in esterni sono i motivi di maggiore preoccupazione.

Molti di questi pericoli, comunque, vengono considerati solo moderati, anche perché molti degli spedizionieri ritengono di essere in grado si fronteggiarli con successo.

L’eziologia di alcuni effetti avversi è incerta: per esempio, c’è stata un’inattesa riattivazione di virus latenti (herpes ed Epstein-Barr) tra il personale di spedizioni in Antartide e nello spazio (Suedfeld e Steel, 2000). Questo fenomeno potrebbe essere legato allo stress, ma potrebbe anche essere imputato alla mancanza di difese immunitarie durante l’incapsulamento dell’equipaggio.

Un altro problema è il rumore. Il rumore costante, monotono e le vibrazioni dei macchinari può interferire con il riposo e la concentrazione. Le tempeste polari sono inoltre fonti di rumore forte e persistente, che alla lunga può innervosire notevolmente. Ovviamente, il rumore può anche trasformarsi in piacere quando riguarda il suono di radio, musica e televisione, oltre che si suoni piacevoli della natura.

 

5.2 – Fattori Psico-Ambientali

Densità: le capsule tendono ad essere piccole per ragioni di tipo pratico (costi di costruzione, maggiore efficienza, minore dispersione termica, composizione limitata del gruppo). Questa condizione non si può applicare alle stazioni antartiche in inverno, in quanto la portata del gruppo si riduce drasticamente, ma lo sono in estate, quando il gruppo è più numeroso. Molte capsule in questa stagione non permettono all’equipaggio di avere spazi personali, la privacy necessaria e la distanza minima dalle altre

persone. Queste condizioni disturbano la necessità di avere un luogo dove poter stare soli occasionalmente. Probabilmente il letto è l’unico spazio privato di cui ogni membro dell’equipaggio dispone. Curiosamente una possibile soluzione potrebbe venire da un noto programma televisivo “Grande Fratello”: all’interno della casa, dove vi è alta densità di abitanti e mancanza di spazi privati viene istituito il “confessionale” dove è possibile passare del tempo in solitudine, magari sfogandosi dei

propri problemi in un dialogo solitario oppure (nonostante questo non venga messo in onda) con uno psicologo che interagisca con chi parla.

L’isolamento all’interno della capsula: L’isolamento può portare a reazioni nevrotiche, apatia, disordini del sonno, stress psicologico risultante dalla stanchezza, dalla mancanza di informazioni e dalla sindrome ipomaniacale da post-isolamento.

Confinamento: Percepito maggiormente durante le spedizioni aerospaziali, la sensazione di essere confinati e non potersi muovere dalla capsula si può evitare con l’interruzione della monotonia, ad esempio inserendo all’interno della capsula piante o animali da curare che aiutano l’equipaggio a ridurre stress e noia. I fattori che accompagnano frequentemente la sensazione del confinamento sono la mancanza di esercizio fisico, e il conseguente decondizionamento.I soggetti provano stato di sonnolenza, depressione e declino generalizzato dell’umore; comportamenti compulsivi, problemi psicosomatici ed ipodinamia, la conseguenza dell’insufficienza di attività motoria. Questa condizione

può portare ad atrofia muscolare e a minori performance cognitive e motorie. Monotonia: la mancanza di novità e di variazione a livello sensoriale, la mancanza di cambiamenti all’interno come all’esterno, sia del paesaggio che dei compiti da svolgere, possono portare a sensazioni di noia, depressione, minor reattività.

 

5.3 – Fattori sociali

Monotonia sociale: il fatto di dover stare insieme forzatamente e la monotonia sociale sono sicuramente tra i fattori maggiori di stress (Suefeld, Steel, 2000). Smith (1969) conclude che dopo 2 o più settimane di confinamento, i più irritanti comportamenti erano considerati l’inadeguatezza della leadership e il comportamento degli altri. L’arrivo di visitatori o i rimpiazzi possono essere buoni alleati per spezzare la monotonia sociale. Questo rimedio, comunque, presenta una doppia faccia, se da un lato interrompe la monotonia pone anche nuovi compiti al gruppo: i nuovi arrivati hanno bisogno di attenzioni, rompono la routine del gruppo e pongono problemi di integrazione all’interno del team già esistente.

Conflitti: i conflitti possono accendersi tra membri dell’equipaggio così come tra superiori e membri.

L’ammiraglio Bird (1938) preferì passare l’inverno Artico da solo piuttosto che rischiare di essere accompagnato da qualcuno che avrebbe potuto diventare insopportabile per il modo che aveva di masticare! Il conflitto può essere scatenato anche dalle caratteristiche personale dei soggetti che compongono il gruppo. Come si vedrà più avanti nell’articolo (vedi: La selezione dell’equipaggio: il modello giapponese) alcune nazioni insistono sulla selezione di un gruppo armonioso piuttosto che sull’individuo in se.

Ruoli Sociali: Al momento dell’arrivo nella postazione l’individuo si trova di frequente in mezzo a persone sconosciute e deve di conseguenza ricostruire un ruolo sociale all’interno del nuovo gruppo.

L’autostima e la valutazione di sé diventano in questo momento cruciali, in quanto il soggetto si trova analizzato e scrutato da persone quasi o totalmente sconosciute. La creazione di una nuova identità all’interno del gruppo, la nascita di una micro cultura, o peggio, di più microculture, la creazione di nuovi concetti di se in relazione agli altri sono ulteriori fonti di stress. Ruoli incompatibili (ad esempio il personale militare e gli scienziati civili) possono portare conflitti, generalmente sulla base del diverso centraggio della missione o sulle differenti priorità della stessa.

Queste tensioni possono portare a divisioni all’interno del gruppo con la conseguente formazione di sottogruppi o addirittura di un intero gruppo contro un solo individuo. Creare chiarezza nei ruoli, da parte della direzione, può essere un modo per facilitare il processo iniziale e creare minori conflitti.

Comunicazione: All’interno della capsula la comunicazione interpersonale viene accentuata. Altman e Haytorn (1965, 1967) hanno mostrato come il confinamento in questo particolare ambiente aumenti l’intimità e l’apertura verso gli altri. I soggetti che si sono inizialmente aperti agli altri, però, potrebbero pentirsi di averlo fatto, in un momento successivo. Facilmente, infatti, si verificano perdite di informazioni, pettegolezzi tra compagni che possono portare a numerosi sentimenti negativi.

Mantenere la segretezza di alcune informazioni diventa quasi impossibile. In particolare, nei gruppi a prevalenza maschile, le donne sono spesso oggetto di pettegolezzi riguardanti la loro (supposta) disponibilità sessuale (Rothblum et al., 1998). In un contesto così isolato la comunicazione diventa comunicazione è non solo nei messaggi con la base, che fornisce ovviamente importanti informazioni e consigli utili, ma anche con la famiglia, gli amici e i colleghi, capace di risollevare l’umore e provocare sensazioni positive e di sollievo a molti dei soggetti in isolamento.

D’altro canto, la mancanza di informazioni, o ancora peggio, cattive notizie da casa, possono essere foriere di rabbia, depressioni e frustrazione in caso il soggetto si senta impotente nell’aiutare o partecipare a ciò che succede in famiglia.

Sesso: Molti programmi in Antartide, sia americani che russi, includono regolarmente membri femminili nell’equipaggio. I risultati sono generalmente buoni, anche se si è verificato l’insorgere di alcune gelosie o competizioni sessuali, mentre alcune donne hanno trovato l’eccesso di attenzioni scomodo e difficile.

Nonostante la NASA non abbia riscontrato articolarti differenza nelle performance tra i due sessi, in caso di missioni spaziali, in Russia è stato notato che “per alcune delle mansioni a bordo che richiedono attenzione e accuratezza, le donne si sono dimostrate capaci di agire in modo più efficiente rispetto agli uomini” (Gubarev, 1983, p. 38 in Suefeld e Steel, 2000).

 

5.4 – Fattori Temporali

Durata: uno degli aspetti critici della permanenza in capsula è la durata del periodo. Il fattore tempo impatta tutte le variabili fisiche e psicologiche che abbiamo precedentemente menzionato, in virtù del fatto che molti degli stressori non sono particolarmente gravi, ma possono diventarlo accumulandosi con il tempo, mentre l’equipaggio potrebbe non rendersi conto della loro presenza fino a che siano diventati ormai gravi. Per questo motivo è molto importante un costante monitoraggio dei primi sintomi di stress in modo da adottare per tempo le appropriate contromisure.

Con il passare del tempo, inoltre, è possibile che la motivazione e il morale subiscano un declino, mentre, in particolare per gli spedizionieri in Antartide, eventuali lacune nella preparazione venono riconosciute aumenta la preoccupazione per eventuali pericoli durante le spedizioni polari, il lavoro e persino l’attività ricreativa.

Ciononostante, vi sono anche aspetti positivi in una durata lunga ma ragionevole di una missione polare. Le capacità di coping e le confidenza tra membri aumentano con il passare del tempo, mentre si riduce l’apprensione per la difficoltà dei compiti da affrontare.

Cicli: I ritmi circadiani, in particolare il ciclo sonno-veglia, se alterati, possono dare luogo a situazioni critiche. Molti individui possono essere soggetti ad aumenti di stress, sia fisiologico che psicologico, significativi nel caso i loro ritmi naturali non vengano rispettati. Programmazione: la divisione del tempo lavorativo e del tempo ricreativo ha una grande importanza. A volte l’eccesso di lavoro può essere stressante, ma quello che spesso passa inosservato è il contrario:

l’eccessivo tempo libero, in una situazione come quella Antartica può essere ugualmente nocivo.

Durante il tempo libero, infatti, difficilmente si trova distrazione da quelli che sono gli aspetti negativi della capsula: l’isolamento, la mancanza di spazi privati, le condizioni climatiche esterne (specialmente durante l’inverno). Stati di coscienza alterati, eccessiva sonnolenza, percezione rallentata del passare del tempo e rallentamento delle funzioni cognitive, sono i sintomi più diffusi, spesso erroneamente confusi come sintomi di deterioramento mentale. Importante da questo punto di vista è la presenza di un adeguato numero di distrazioni per i tempi morti da affrontare durante la permanenza.

Le seguenti tabelle propongono un riassunto dei principali fattori di stress, con le cause, i sintomi, le conseguenze sullo stato psicologico e fisiologico e le possibili precauzioni per evitare conseguenze negative.

 

 

6 – Caratteristiche principali per la bona riuscita della missione

6.1 – L’importanza dell’armonia all’interno del gruppo di lavoro

Come abbiamo visto precedentemente la compatibilità tra membri del gruppo è una caratteristica estremamente importante per la buona riuscita del compito. Shears e Gunderson (1966) la considerano come una delle condizioni più importanti per l’efficacia di una stazione antartica, importante quasi come la performance lavorativa, per un adattamento effettivo all’ambiente antartico.

Peri e Tortora (1989) sono stati tra i primi in Italia ad investigare questa particolare area, purtroppo con risultati iniziali scarsi, a causa dell’insufficiente partecipazione da parte dei soggetti ai test utilizzati. La difficoltà ad ottenere appoggio dall’equipaggio è dovuta alla scarsa considerazione dell’aspetto psicologico di tali missioni, diffuso specialmente in passato. Attualmente le condizioni sono cambiate e Peri et al. (2000) hanno potuto condurre felicemente un’indagine volta a studiare l’evoluzione delle relazioni umane durante il soggiorno in Antartide, che tenesse in conto le dinamiche intra- ed interpersonali utilizzando una versione italiana del MIPG (Matrix of Intra and Interpersonal Processes in

the Group), meno personale ed invasivo rispetto ad altri metodi e quindi risultato più accettabile dai soggetti. Si noti che l’esperimento metteva a confronto le modificazioni avvenute in una campagna di due mesi in Antartide da parte di due diversi gruppi, il primo più numeroso (40 elementi) e il secondo più ridotto (solo 15 soggetti). Nonostante i due gruppi non presentassero particolari disparità all’inizio della campagna, le differenze finali risultano essere notevolmente accentuate dal soggiorno stesso. Il gruppo che inizialmente presentava una maggiore ansia e minore armonia interpersonale ha registrato un aumento finale dell’ansia e un’ulteriore diminuzione dell’armonia; il gruppo meno ansioso e più

armonico ha registrato invece una maggiore armonia e un calo dei livelli dell’ansia. Peri et al. (1991) ipotizzano che l’ambiente Antartico abbia la capacità di intensificare le caratteristiche delle relazioni umane, siano esse positive o negative. Un’altra risorsa importante, che ha il potere di condizionare positivamente il gruppo è il grado di apertura e di chiusura tra i membri stessi e tra i membri e i leader.

Questa caratteristica nell’esperimento è rimasta costante per l’intero periodo all’interno del gruppo, nonostante ciò, gli autori precisano che verso la fine del progetto in uno dei due gruppi appariva un umore irritabile che è rimasto latente, ma che forse sarebbe potuto sbocciare con l’andare del tempo.

 

6.2 – La selezione dell’equipaggio: il modello giapponese

Weiss et al. (2000) hanno condotto uno studio sulle caratteristiche del gruppo di lavoro giapponese per le missioni in Antartide, nella stazione polare di Asuka, al fine di individuare eventuali differenze con i team occidentali. Il processo di selezione, effettuati per il Japanese Antartic Resarch Expedition (o JARE), come primo punto era particolarmente centrato sull’abilità personale di completare i compiti assegnati all’individuo, con un occhio di riguardo alla composizioni di gruppi che potessero lavorare insieme in modo efficiente e privo di particolare difficoltà. In quelli che sono i criteri standard della selezione degli equipaggi per le missioni in Antartide, abilità, compatibilità e stabilità (Gunderson,

1974), i primi due sono considerati i più importanti, in contrasto con lametodologia comunemente adottata in Europa che considera la prima e l’ultima come le caratteristiche più rilevanti.

Non è solo questo però, secondo gli autori, a rendere intrigante e degna di nota la metodologia giapponese. Nonostante la ricerca psicologica non sia tra le priorità del JARE ci son state indagini sulle modalità in cui il popolo giapponese si adatta alle condizioni polari (i.e. Takami, 1991). Generalmente le condizioni di vita giapponesi sono caratterizzate da forte affollamento e mancanza di spazi personali, condizioni che hanno sviluppato nella popolazione strumenti difensivi che permettono di convivere fortunatamente con queste condizioni (e.g. vedi Raybeck, 1992).

Il senso del gruppo, inoltre, è molto forte in netto contrasto con la mentalità individualista occidentale, e fin da piccoli i bambini imparano a far parte di gruppi in modo armonioso e a collaborare per raggiungere scopi comuni. I risultati dell’indagine di Weiss et al. (2000) compiuta nell’arco di tre anni su un campione di 107 maschi giapponesi, la maggioranza di cui non era mai stata in Antartide prima, ha messo in luce che gli spedizionieri avevano alti livelli di resistenza allo stress, erano più orientati allo scopo e meno orientati verso emozioni negative rispetto ad un campione di nordamericani studiato precedentemente durante l’estate Artica, già di per se meno difficoltosa dell’inverno nella stessa regione.

Il fatto che non siano stati rilevati cambiamenti significativi nei tratti di personalità stabili durante il periodo in studio, potrebbe inoltre suggerire che il metodo di selezione e di allenamento giapponese per i gruppi di lavoro nell’inverno polare sia particolarmente efficace e consistente nell’usare criteri affidabili nel produrre team che possano resistere e fronteggiare con successo con le condizioni ambientali e sociali artiche.

 

6.3 – Criteri di selezione dei candidati

Per motivi di ovvietà, abbiamo preferito non menzionare il primo screening di selezione dei candidati, basato sulle capacità fisiche, sull’assenza di patologie psicologiche potenzialmente pericolose per il candidato e per gli altri, insufficiente sopportazione dello stress, per passare direttamente alla seconda fase del processo di selezione, ovvero, tra i migliori, scegliere chi è davvero qualificato per questo tipo di missioni.

Diversi criteri sono stati formulati per questo processo:

Gunderson (1973) propone una triarchia di caratteristiche quali: l’abilità nel compito, socievolezza e stabilità emotiva. Il programma spaziale sovietico utilizza, invece, una massiccia batteria di test ed interviste, di cui un test per la resistenza allo stress richiede ad un gruppo di candidati di guidare una piccola vettura attraverso la campagna. Come suggerisce questa attività, lo scopo delle selezioni non è di selezionare un individuo ma un gruppo di persone, sulla base di come lavorano e si coordinano vicendevolmente, la compatibilità di gruppo è considerata, come abbiamo visto nell’esempio giapponese, la caratteristica principale nel programmare una missione. Alcuni tratti personali

importanti, che esulano leggermente dagli standard ufficiali, sono il senso dell’umorismo, la sensibilità culturale e la tolleranza (Burrough, 1998).

Tra gli approcci di tipo personalistico il modello “Big Five” (Costa e McCrae, 1992) è stato considerato particolarmente valido per i programmi di selezione degli equipaggi da inviare in capsula.

Generalmente, i candidati da inviare in Artide e Antartide hanno punteggi più alti in tutti i settori rispetto alla norma, eccetto che nel fattore nevroticismo, ovvero la summenzionata “stabilità emotiva” di Gunderson.

 

7 – Conclusioni

Numerosi studi si sono occupati delle condizioni psicologiche dei gruppi di lavoro in Antartide. Come abbiamo visto, questo tipo di ambiente presenta una notevole serie di caratteristiche che lo rendono unico e interessante dal punto di vista dell’andamento psicologico dei soggetti che vi affrontano un periodo più o meno lungo. Gli studi che sono stati compiuti hanno evidenziato le numerose caratteristiche possono portare a situazioni di stress, più o meno acute.

Quello che risulta cruciale è l’attenzione che viene posta, nei criteri di selezione, dalla scelta di una squadra piuttosto che ad una serie di individui dotati. Questo approccio potrebbe essere la chiave di un successo ancora maggiore nelle missioni in Antartide. Creare un gruppo in base alle caratteristiche personali di compatibilità e testare il gruppo, piuttosto che l’individuo, può diventare un criterio fondamentale che permetta missioni a contenuti livelli di stress e aumentata armonia, condizioni che non possono che favorire la buona riuscita della missione.

 

Bibliografia

Altman I, Haythorn WW. (1965). Interpersonal exchange in isolation. Sociometry. 28, 411–26.

Altman I, Haythorn WW. (1967). The ecology of isolated groups. Behav. Sci. 32, 169–82.

Berry CA. (1973). View of human problems to be addressed for long-duration space flights. Aerospace Med. 44, 1136–46

Cornelius, P. E. (1991). Life in Antarctica. In A. A. Harrison, Y. A. Clearwater, & C. P. McKay (Eds.), From Antarctica to outer space. New York: Springer-Verlag.

Costa P. T., McCrae R. R. (1992). The NEO PI-R Professional Manual. Odessa, FL: Psychol. Assess. Resour.

Fischer, G. N. (1994). Le ressort invisible: Vivre l’extrême (The invisible spring: Live the extreme). Paris: Seuil.

Gunderson, E.K.E. (1966). Adaptation to extreme environments: Prediction of performance (Unit Report no. 66-17). San Diego, CA: U.S. Navy Medical Neuropsychiatric Research Unit.

Gunderson, E.K.E. (1974). Psychological studies in Antarctica. In E.K.E. Gunderson (Ed.), Human adaptability to Antarctic conditions (pp. 115-131). Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union.

Gunderson, E.K.E., & Nelson, P. D. (1963). Adaptation of small groups to extreme environments. Aerospace Medicine, 34, 1111-1115.

Harrison, A. A., & Connors, M. M. (1984). Groups in exotic environments. In L. Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 18, pp. 49-87). New York: Academic Press.

Helmreich, R. L. (1983). Applying psychology in outer space: Unfulfilled promises revisited. American Psychologist, 38, 445-450.

Law, P. (1960). Personality problems in Antarctica. The Medical Journal of Australia , 47, 273-282.

Lugg, D. J. (1977). Physiological adaptation and health of an expedition in Antarctica, with comment on behavioral adaptation (ANARE Scientific Reports No. 126). Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.

Mocellin, J. S., Suefeld, P. (1991). Voices from the ice: Dieries of Polar Explorers. Environment and Behavior. 23 (6), 704-722.

Mocellin, J. S., Suedfeld, P., Bernaldez, J. P., & Barbarito, M. E. (1991). Levels of anxiety in polar environments. Journal of Environmental Psychology , 11, 265-275.

Natani, K., & Shurley, J. T. (1974). Sociopsychological aspects of a winter vigil at South Pole station. In E.K.E. Gunderson (Ed.), Human adaptability to Antarctic conditions (pp. 89- 114). Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union.

Nelson, P. D., & Gunderson, E.K.E. (1964). Analyse des dimensions de l’adjustment au sein de petits groupes (Analysis of adjustment dimensions in small confined groups). Bulletin du Centre Etudes Recherche de Psychologie, 13(2), 111-126.

Olivetti Belardinelli, M. (1978). La costruzione della realtà (The construction of reality). Turin, Italy: Boringhieri.

Peri, A., Barbarito, M., Barattoni, M., Abraham, A. (2000). The Dynamics and the interpersonal relations within an isolated group in extreme environments. Small Group Research, 31 (3). 251-274.

Palinkas, L. A. (1986). Health and performance of Antarctic winter-over personnel: A follow-up study. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 57, 549-559.

Raybeck, D. (1992). Proxemics and privacy: Managing the problems of life in confined environ- ments. In A. A. Harrison, Y. A. Clearwater, & C. P. McKay (Eds.), From Antarctica to outer space: Life in isolation and confinement. NewYork: Springer-Verlag.

Rothblum ED, Weinstock JS, Morris JF, eds. (1998). Women in the Antarctic. Binghamton, NY: Harrington Park.

Shears, L. M., & Gunderson, E.K.E. (1966). Stable attitude factors in natural isolated groups. The Journal of Social Psychology, 70, 199-204.

Suedfeld, P. (1991). Polar Psychology: An Overview. Environment and Behavior. 23 (6), 653-665.

Suedfeld, P. (1998). Homo invictus: The indomitable species. Canadian Psychology, 38, 164-173.

Suedfeld, P., Steel, D. (2000). The Environmental psychology of Capsule Habitats. Annual Review of Psychology. 51, 227-253.

Stuster, J. (1996). Bold endeavors: Lessons from space and polar exploration. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press.

Taylor, A.J.W. (1987). Antarctic psychology. Wellington, New Zealand: Science Information Publishing Centre.

Karine Weiss, Peter Suedfeld, G. Daniel Steel and Masafumi Tanaka (2000). Psychological Adjustment during Three Japanese Antarctic Research Expeditions. Environment and Behavior. 32 (1), 142-156.

 

 

 

© Vita in ambienti confinati: aspetti psicologici e criteri di selezione del team – Anna Rosso